Tabletop Game Review: Principle Dilemma

Principle Dilemma

By design, games are meant to do two things: entertain and educate. Games of all varieties can teach a player about the world around them, ingrain useful problem-solving skills, and/or help them learn about the other people playing the game. Principle Dilemma — a card game created by Joe Tarnowski that’s currently raising funding on Kickstarter — is definitely meant to help players learn more about those around them.

For a game that centers on exploring ethically gray situations and the moral discrepancies between people, Principle Dilemma is a pretty straightforward game. Every round a single player will draw a dilemma card, which describes a hypothetical situation, and then that player will choose which of the available actions they would take in the situation. After they’ve made their choice, the remaining players use their deceit cards to try to make the first player change their action. These deceit cards adjust variables in the dilemma, such as almost ensuring that an actor won’t suffer any negative consequences for their actions or adjust the social norms of any given situation.

If another player’s deceit card can make the starting player change their answer to the dilemma, they get a point. If the starting player once again chooses their original action under these new circumstances, the starting player gets a point. This goes on for as many rounds as the players like, and then whoever has the most points at the end of the game wins.

As you’ve probably realized from reading this description, it’d be really easy to bullshit your way to victory in this game. But the goal of Principle Dilemma isn’t to win, it’s to better understand the people you’re playing with.

Whether you’ve known someone for years or are playing the game as an ice breaker, Principle Dilemma is a great way to learn more about people. The entire game is centered on figuring out the other players’ sense of morality and determining what kind of changes to a situation will alter their actions. Principle Dilemma is a fantastic game to play if you want to become fast friends with people or if you’d like really explore your oldest companions’ sense of right and wrong.

It’s also worth noting that Principle Dilemma is a stylish delight. The box containing the cards was etched with artwork inspired by Greek mythology and philosophy. The cards themselves continue this theme and it’s clear that a great deal of consideration went into creating the aesthetic of this game.

If you’re more of a competitive person and play tabletop games to outwit and defeat the other players, this card game probably isn’t for you. However, if you’re looking for a fun and original icebreaker, Principle Dilemma is perfect for you. Whether you’re playing with people for the first time or the hundredth time, Principle Dilemma is a great way to learn more about the other players or test how well you think you know them.

 

*Disclaimer: An early copy of Principle Dilemma was provided without charge for the purpose of writing this review*

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tabletop Game Review: Principle Dilemma

‘Pokemon Let’s Go’: Polishing Away Personality

Pokemon Let’s GO Pikachu and Let’s Go Eevee released on November 16th, 2018. They exist somewhere between a remake and a reimagining of Pokemon Yellow, which is an enhanced version of the original Pokemon Red and Blue that borrows elements from the Pokemon anime and allows a player to start the game with Pikachu. The Pokemon Let’s Go games also exist in a weird grey area between sequel and remake, as some story events – like Red and Blue becoming powerful trainers – already happened, while other plot points – like the downfall of Team Rocket – happen over the course of the Let’s Go games.

Of course, these titles also incorporate a lot of mechanics from the exceptionally popular mobile game, Pokemon GO and dial back some more complicated mechanics from the mainline games to make these titles more approachable for newcomers to the series. More notably, though, are the numerous changes to the story, world, and characters. On the surface, these changes by in large improve the Let’s Go games over the originals, and make the games feel quite a bit more thought out and refined. For instance, in the Let’s Go games the Elite Four are far more established figures before a player encounters them and the rival character adds the Lavender Town Cubone to his team as a way of helping it cope with the passing of its mother.

However, in adding layer after layer of polish to Pokemon Let’s Go the games lost what made the originals great in the first place. Authenticity, character, and ambition were far more important to the Pokemon franchise taking off than impressive graphics or a well-paced story. In this essay, I’ll argue how the Pokemon Let’s Go games fundamentally misunderstand what made the games they’re imitating some of the most successful in the history of the gaming medium.

 

Authenticity: Something Only Friends Could Make

 

Game Freak, the company that develops the Pokemon games, originally started as a self-published video game hobbyist magazine, that saw enough success for the creators of the magazine, Satoshi Tajiri and Ken Sugimori, to pursue creating their own games. While they tried to make the original Pokemon games right out of the gate, financial constraints and a lack of expertise forced them to shelve the project and pursue developing games that would generate short term revenue. After bouncing back from near bankruptcy, the team rallied together and finished the first entry in what would become one of the most successful multimedia franchises in existence.

With this kind of development process, it’s no wonder that an absurd amount of passion and dedication pours out of every aspect of the original Pokemon games. They are the product of a cohesive group of people working towards a goal they all shared and could visualize as a team. They were making a game for themselves because they believed in the idea, not because they thought it’d be a commercial success.   

That’s why there are a good number of odd elements in what are children’s games, like playing slot machines in the game corner or a drunken man blocking your path in Viridian City. Game Freak developers imaged stuff like that as a part of the world of Pokemon, so they put it in the first games. The Pokemon Let’s Go titles whittle down these elements to make something more sterile and better suited for the millions of kids and young people whose first experience with Pokemon is likely Pokemon GO or the ongoing anime. These new Pokemon games care far more about making something that’s popular and has all the rough edges removed, instead of creating something that the people behind it believe in and want to put into the world.

Character: An Identity 20 Years In the Making

The original Pokemon games gave every character and monster just enough personality for the player to infer who they were and then fill in the gaps themselves. Brock was a shirtless, flexing tough guy that played into him being the first major hurdle in the games, and Pokemon like Electrode and Golbat were given just enough personality in their designs to figure out how they might behave. Sure, the personality of each of the characters and monsters were pretty barebones, but there was just enough there to engage with and suggest that the creators had a solid idea of who these people and creatures were.

The Pokemon Let’s Go games take this happy middle and push it to both ends of the spectrum. Human characters like Brock are now hyper-defined and in line with the version of the character made popular by the anime. Likewise, all of the Pokemon in the game lack the posing and expression that made them feel like actual monsters and are now presented more simply and animalistically. All characters are now rigidly defined if they’re people, or, if they’re Pokemon, blank slates for the player to imprint whatever personality they’d like.

For instance, Lt. Surge in Pokemon Red and Blue is a tough, brash, and a way into himself army guy. There’s also just enough lore in the original games to figure out why he might be like this and how he fits into this quirky world. However, in Pokemon Heart Gold and Soul Silver, his character is built outwards rather than upwards. In these games, we learn that this rough and tough army guy’s favorite Pokemon is the adorable little Pikachu. In the Pokemon Let’s Go games, instead of expanding his character, his already existing character elements are merely reinforced, as seen when the full of himself Lt. Surge gives the player his autograph after his defeat.

Reducing the personality in the titular pocket monsters is also a detriment to these psudo-remakes. By placing more of an emphasis on how these monsters would realistically exist in a world, they lose a lot of their charm. In the original games, Golbat was a zany vampire bat with an impossibly large mouth and outstretched tongue that made it feel erratic and vaguely threatening like it couldn’t wait to bit into a person or monster. Similarly, Electrode’s wide grin and big eyes made it feel like it was full of energy and happy to be alive. The, admittedly beautiful, HD interpretations of the monsters in Pokemon Let’s Go place more emphasis on the creatures looking at home in the world, rather than giving them more personality. The end result is that in the newest Pokemon games Golbat and Electrode just end up looking like a big, weird bat and a slightly anthropomorphized ball, respectively.

The Pokemon Let’s Go games make the characters feel like they have to be a hyper-specific thing, rather than more fluid, realistic characters with a hodgepodge of personality quirks. Sure, Pokemon Let’s Go does give these characters more exploration than the original games, but it only plays up one element of their personality, rather than expanding outward to make them feel more fleshed out. This choice coupled with the focus on believability in the Pokemon designs, just makes the Pokemon Let’s Go games have much less personality than their predecessors. It doesn’t feel like there is any passion or thought put behind these characters like in the original games, instead, they are just presented as entities rigidly shaped by 20 years of marketing.

 

Ambition: Capturing The Feeling of Impossibility

 

The most impressive feature of the original Pokemon games, by far, is the scope of these original Game Boy titles. Held together with gum and shoestring, as evident by the many peculiar and game breaking bugs, the developers used every shortcut possible to make these titles almost impossibly dense. Even by today’s standards, an RPG with 151 playable characters who all have their own unique movesets and stats is practically unheard of; and the original Pokemon games made this happen on a portable console originally released in 1989.

It’s a pretty well-known story in the Pokemon fandom that the mythical Mew was only added to the game after Game Freak removed the debug tools and realized that they had just enough space left to add one more monster. This really demonstrates how the original Pokemon games pushed the Game Boy console and Game Boy cartridge to their very limits. This is an extremely impressive feat that helped make Pokemon a hit series, and when Pokemon Gold and Silver topped this impressive density by having the games be literally twice as big as the first generation, it cemented the franchise as one of the greatest in gaming. Of course, neither of these feats would have been possible if not for the tireless work of the Game Freak developers and the last minute intervention of coding genius Satoru Iwata in Gold and Silver’s development.

The Pokemon Let’s Go games don’t utilize the Nintendo Switch to its fullest potential. This is somewhat understandable considering how much earlier Let’s Go launched in the Switch’s lifespan than Red and Blue launched on the Game Boy’s, but the Let’s Go games don’t even push the console harder than the console’s launch titles. You never hear the fans in the Switch whirring up in Let’s Go to compensate for how demanding the game is on the system like you do when playing The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. These games don’t push the Switch’s features, they merely incorporate them into what is now the well tested Pokemon formula.     

Granted, this does make the Pokemon Let’s Go games the best looking in the franchise by far and it’s a genuine treat to have Pokemon running around in the overworld instead of hiding in grass, but these ideas aren’t pushed as far as the Switch allows. Each Pokemon could have more battle animations than the two or three they’re given, human characters could do more than just hop in place to convey action, and gym and dungeon puzzles can be more elaborate than what the original Game Boy allowed. Instead of changes that push the hardware, players instead are treated to cutscenes and story changes that wink at Pokemon’s extensive lore. While these are nice and certainly appreciated by veteran Pokemon fans, they aren’t what made the first Pokemon games successful. The original Pokemon games were incredible because their realized scope and ambition made them feel like something that shouldn’t exist, yet the passion, skill, and dedication of the developers made them a reality against all odds.

 

Conclusion: Polish That Misses The Point

 

Pokemon Let’s Go Pikachu! And Let’s Go Eevee! are really good Pokemon games that seamlessly add new mechanics, are a great way for new players to experience the series, and a nostalgic feast for the franchise’s oldest fans. It’s an exceptionally polished work that can only happen after decades of refining the Pokemon game experience. However, when a game is polished to this mirror sheen – to a point where there’s no better version of this experience, merely a different one – it lets a player see into themselves and figure out what made them fall in love with Pokemon in the first place.

It’s not the stunning visuals, story, or even premise of catching monsters that made me love the first Pokemon games; it was the authenticity, character, and ambition of Pokemon Red and Blue that made me a lifelong fan of the series. The feeling that I was holding something in my hands that shouldn’t exist, something that took me on a magical journey with a bunch of cool characters and strange monsters, and that it never failed to surprise me at every turn; those elements are what made the original Pokemon games some of the best in the history of the medium.

Maybe I’m just nostalgic for that feeling of wonderment that comes with experiencing something terrific as a kid, when everything seems more magical than it really is. However, the Pokemon Let’s Go games were supposed to be a better version of Pokemon Yellow, which itself is an enhanced version of Pokemon Red and Blue. Pokemon Let’s Go misunderstood what made Red, Blue, and Yellow amazing in the first place and doubled down on the set dressing and story of the original games. If it really wanted to capture and surpass the feeling of Pokemon Red, Blue, and Yellow, the Pokemon Let’s Go games should have strived to be as authored, imaginative, and ambitious as the games they are trying to improve upon.            

   

 

  

 

        

‘Pokemon Let’s Go’: Polishing Away Personality

Pop Culture Wednesday: “Tetris”, the Movie(s)

Happy Wednesday internet! This is Pop Culture Wednesday, the place where any and everything pop culture related is analyzed and critiqued with gusto. Today’s topic is a heavy one , so let’s jump right into it.

Would you believe me if I told you that the classic and phenomenal video game Tetris was being made into a movie? I imagine your reacting would be mix between being upset and confused. Video games being turned into movies is not a new concept, while it has never been an entirely successful one. However, most of those video game movies have narratives that would work in the medium of film, such as Rachet and Clank or Assassin’s Creed. Others, at the very least, are vague or broad enough conceptually that the can be easily molded into a movie, such as Mortal Combat or Street FighterTetris, though, has none of those qualities and exists wholly as an entity that can only be expressed through the medium of video games. So, of course Hollywood is not making a Tetris movie, they are making three of them.

Tetris

The first entry in the project is currently three years in development, has an eighty million dollar project, and will begin shooting in China shortly. I am not excited for this movie. I generally try to give every film or creative idea the benefit of the doubt, but I anticipate this film to be extremely, extraordinarily, intensely bad. Which I am upset about, not because I have a deep attachment to Tetris, but because it could stall a lot of other films.

Nintendo has recently been making some noise about bringing a few of its properties to the silver screen. This could actually be incredible, as many of the House of Mario’s properties,  Metroid, like Star Fox, and F-Zero, would be a perfect fit for film. There is even an ongoing bidding war over the rights to make a live action Pokemon movie, which is already a franchise that has transcended the video game medium to become a multi-media juggernaut.

However, if the classic game Tetris does poorly in theaters, I could totally see Nintendo no longer wanting to bring their classic franchise to the new medium. Granted, this is mostly speculation on my part; but it would be a shame if awesome movies were not made because of an ill advised bad movie. In summation, video game movies have the potential to be good, despite their track record, but the Tetris trilogy will most likely be bad.

BaddaBing, BaddaBye

Pop Culture Wednesday: “Tetris”, the Movie(s)

Game Grind: OVERWATCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Happy Saturday BaddaBing BaddaBlog readers! This is Game Grind, the place where any and everything video game related is analyzed, discussed, and critiqued with gusto. Today’s post is going to be for a game that isn’t even out yet, but has already been declared one of the best games of 2016. I am speaking, of course, about Blizzard’s illustrious  Overwatch. 

Overwatch

This game’s beta, which ended two weeks ago and has since created a hole in most people’s being, was more successful than many of the titles that actually released that week. The beta and the game both received a crap load of free advertising due to the changing of a character’s supposedly “sexual” victory pose and searches for Overwatch on PornHub have risen by over 800 percent since the beta’s launch. People love Blizzard’s newest IP, and here’s why.

Overwatch contains gameplay that caters to all kinds of gamers. While everything is definitely molded around an FPS style, each of the playable characters are unique enough that playing with them makes the game feel more like one of FPS’s subgenres. If you like classic FPSs, you can get that by playing as Tracer or Solider 76. If you like FPSs that have MOBA elements, Torbjorn and Bastion (Android 16) have you covered. If you enjoy stealth and close quarters combat, Genji is your man. This game has been so popular because it really does feel like there is a little something for everyone in it.

Overwatch 2

This game is also brimming with originality, creativity, and great characters. There have been a lot of people saying that Overwatch is just Team Fortress, but with waifus; but that really does not do the game justice. Each of the characters have such a unique and compelling design and backstory that it pains me that none of that will be explored in this online only game. The Overwatch videos that Blizzard has been putting out helps to fill that void, but I really wish there was an aspect of the game that really got into the meat of each and every one of the characters. All of them are very fun and interesting and I wish we could get more of that in game.

Alrighty, that’s the bulk of it, but here are some stray observations.

  • Bastion is not OP; Genji, Widowmaker, and Reinheart can totally wreck him.
  • The fact that two of the characters, Bastion and Genji, are so similar to characters from two other franchise I love, DBZ’s Android 16 and MGS’s Cyborg Ninja, is very weird to me.
  • If you only ever play with a single character, you are not playing Overwatch right.
  • Every team needs a healer. If you get into a match and no one is a healer, play as a healer for a while.
  • Capturing Objective > Kills
  • The loot box system is a good way to reward players for leveling up, but I feel like there needs to be something more if Blizzard wants to keep players engaged for the long term.
  • Overwatch is available for purchase on May 24th. Keep strong in the interim.

That just about does it for this week’s post of Game Grind. If you enjoyed it, please leave a like or a comment down below and be sure to stop by here on Monday for the next installment of Manga (And Also Anime) Monday. Have a great weekend!

BaddaBing, BaddaBye

Game Grind: OVERWATCH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Pop Culture Wednesday: Truly Titanic

Happy Wednesday! BaddaBing BaddaBlog is back bitches! We died a little bit going into finals week and the month leading up to it, but somebody used a Phoenix Down and now 4B is ready to go for the gravy! Also, I’m about 30 hours into Bravely Second, so expect references like that to become a bit commonplace. In the meantime though, here’s a Pop Culture Wednesday post dedicated to a cartoon that was so kick-ass it had to be cancelled, Teen Titans………..and by extension the infuriating remake/re-imagining thing Teen Titans GO! Before we start, I just want to give a quick shout out to one half of Blair Huggles for inspiring this post. Thanks dude! Alright, let’s do this.

TeenTitansLogo

I have said it before and I will say it again, DC does waaaaaaaaaaay better than Marvel when it comes to television. When it comes to movies…….not so much. I’m still marination on everything I want to say about BvS, but you can expect a post about why that movie didn’t work sometime in the near future. Today, though, this post is dedicated to the tragic awesomeness that was Teen Titans.

Teen_titans

This cartoon nailed it from the ground up. The basic premise of the program revolves around a team of teenage superheros fighting crime and super villains in a quirky half comic book half anime aesthetic, while repeatedly dealing with and confronting their own weaknesses, short comings, and flaws. The show’s ability to be humerus, heartwarming, and action packed all within a single episode is bar-none and truly a representation of the thematically diverse stories comics can tell.

And then it was cancelled, out of nowhere, on a cliffhanger that involved one of the more interesting characters in the show maybe coming back to life. This cancellation was made, to the best of my knowledge and after a fair bit of research, for literally adequate reason! Cartoon Network execs didn’t like the pitch for the sixth season pitch and decided to cancel it. Apparently the execs didn’t like the direction the show was heading. Which is doubly frustrating considering we got THIS a few years later.

GalleryTV_1920x1080_TeenTitansGo_554d48797553c0.94296848

Teen Titans GO!

God damn it all.

This fart joke infused, lowest common denominator of a comedic cartoon is the direction people in power at Cartoon Network wanted the show to head in. This show is not good at all; I suppose it’s passable by modern Cartoon Network standards, but it does not even deserve to be in the shadow of its predecessor. I do not like this show whatsoever; primarily because it gave me hope that the Teen Titans that I knew and loved would be coming back, only to take a colossal dump on it.

To be fair, I am being hyper critical here. The show has actually been pretty upfront about it being a let down to fans of its predecessor and has actually made some clever jokes for fans of DC comics. I’m just upset that when kids think of Teen Titans nowadays, they think of GO! instead of the better version I experienced. Damn, I got old.

Maybe I’m looking at the old show through rose colored glasses, but it really is stellar and a benchmark in DC’s incredible animated catalog. And I suppose that GO! can never really ruin these characters for me (despite it trying unexplained hard to). Sadly life is full of small concessions and I guess the untimely end and reincarnation of Teen Titans is just one of them.

Wow, that’s a bleak way to end, buuuuut here we are. I hope you enjoyed this post and if you did please leave a like and/or a comment down below. If you want to stay up to date with 4B, you can subscribe via email in the upper right tab. Alternatively, you can like the official BaddaBing BaddaBlog Facebook page or follow me, @LucasDeRuyter, on Twitter. I hope all of you have an awesome rest of the week and be sure to come back here of Friday for the next installment of Game Grind. I’ma geek out about Overwatch!!!

BaddaBing, BaddaBye

Pop Culture Wednesday: Truly Titanic

Game Grind: Covering “Uncovered: Final Fantasy XV”

Happy Saturday BaddaBing BaddaBlog readers! Was your week epic? If it wasn’t, don’t worry, your reading of this post is already gearing you up for an incredibly epic weekend. This is Game Grind! The place where anything related to the wonderful world of video games is covered with the vigor and diligence. Today’s topic relates to an event hosted by the video game company Square Enix called Uncovered: Final Fantasy XV. This event raveled a wealth of information about the highly anticipated game Final Fantasy XV. In this post I will go over some of the biggest take anyways from the event and outline why this information is important. With that said, let’s talk about the next entry in Final Fantasy’s incredible catalog of games.

Final Fantasy 15

The single biggest piece of news from this event is that we finally have a release date for Final Fantasy XV. The game will be released on September 30th, 2016. Well that may still be a ways off, it is incredibly reassuring to have a definitive release date considering that this game has been in production for over seven years. They cynical part of may brain acknowledges that their is a chance it may be pushed back, as is a trend in the video game industry nowadays, but I think that Square Enix is going to be on that ball for this release. They’ve had more than enough time to prepare, after all.

Final Fantasy XV 1

Other surprising news to come out of this event is that it seems like Square Enix wants to turn the XV property into a multimedia sensation. Both a movie and an anime that expand upon the games world and characters have been announced. The anime, which has already had its first episode released and is available on the official Final Fantasy XV YouTube Channel, and focuses on the main characters “bro-ad trip”. The movie will focus Noctis’ father during the events of the game. The trailer looks pretty good, with the CG animation being the high point. Some big Hollywood names are also tied to the film, with Sean Bean being the most noteworthy as the voice of Noctis’ father. Sadly, none of the actor’s will voice the characters in the game. This is understandable, as they would be crazy expensive, but still disappointing. It is also unclear how long the movie will actually be, but, considering that the first anime tie in episode was only twelve minutes long, the movie will probably be under the two hour mark.

Final Fantasy XV 2

The last big piece of information to come out of the Uncovered event is that a demo of the upcoming game is now available for free on the PlayStation Store.  The demo is titled Platinum Demo: Final Fantasy XV and is pretty good for a free demo. A single play-through is between thirty minutes to an hour and the demo mostly focuses on depicting the games beautiful graphics and establishing the main character, Noctis, a bit. Players are also introduced to the Rabbit/Unicorn/Cat/Fox creature depicted above, and its just…….adorable incarnate. Square has promised that our adorable companion will be in the main game, which I am greatly excited about.

All and all this event was a good one that gave some much needed information about Square Enix’s next big title. It really seems like they’re banking on this game being a success, and I personally hope that it is. I love the Final Fantasy series of games and I lament the fact that the last few entries have been indisputably sub-par. I love Square Enix’s game Bravely Default game, but it is kind of a shame that Bravely Default is the best Final Fantasy game to come out in close to a decade. I really hope that FFXV is a return to form for the franchise.

That just about does it for this installment of Game Grind. If you enjoyed it, please leave a like and a comment down below. It is greatly appreciated and I promise I’ll get back to you. If you want to stay up to date with this blog, you can subscribe via email in the upper right corner. Alternatively, you can stay informed by liking the official BaddaBing BaddaBlog Facebook Page or by following me, @LucasDeRuyter, on Twitter. I hope you all have a great weekend and thank you again for reading.

BaddaBing, BaddaBye

Game Grind: Covering “Uncovered: Final Fantasy XV”

Manga (And Also Anime) Monday: Erased Review

Happy Monday BaddaBing BaddaBlog readers! My spring break is over and I am ready to make the last sprint to summer vacation. Or I could quite possibly be in denial. Either way, this is Manga (And Also Anime) Monday! The place where we examine all of the anime and manga goodness. Today’s topic is a series originally written and illustrated by Kei Sanbe and adapted into an anime by A-1 Pictures. This anime may also very well be the best anime to debut in the Spring 2016 season. Today’s topic will be a review of the incredible anime Erased.

Erased 1

The plot of Erased fits nicely in the science-fiction, murder mystery genre. The story focuses on Satoru Fujinuma, a twenty-nine year old pizza delivery boy and struggling manga artist. He is incredibly cold and distant to those around him, specifically his co-worker Airi who develops a romantic internist in him, due to a trauma Satoru suffered in his childhood. When he was eleven, three children Satoru’s age were murdered, two of which Satoru feels like he could have easily prevented if only he had had a better relationship with them. Satoru’s childhood friend Yuuki, who was a young adult when Satoru was eleven, was wrongly convicted of these murders and, at the beginning of the story, is on death row. Satoru believes that he has put these events behind him, but he must confront them again when he is framed for his mother’s murder while she is visiting him. The trauma of this experience activates an ability that Satoru has kept hidden from his friends and family, Revival. This ability sends Satoru back in time to when he was eleven so that he can attempt to prevent the murder of his classmates, save his death row friend, and apprehend the real killer.

Erased 2

Yeah, this anime can be a bit complicated. Buuuuuuuut, that’s not really uncommon for time travel stories. Thankfully Erased does keep things pretty simple in terms of time travel mechanics and does a great job of explaining how things work and character motivations to the audience. However, Erased does have its weak points. As with most time travel stories, the actions of the main character seem a bit strange. I somewhat frequently found myself questioning Satoru’s actions and methods. Also, while this series does have some incredible animation at times, the character models felt off and lackluster at times.

Erased 3

These criticisms by no means ruin the series, though. Erased may very well be one of the best anime to come out this season and it completely deserves this praise. This twelve episode anime packed a ton of content into each and every episode, causing me to constantly reevaluate my opinion of many of the characters. I also found the film reel motif used to represent Satoru’s memory to not only be incredibly well animated, but also fantastically representative of how the pop culture obsessed main character would imagine the concept of memory. Also, with out giving away much of the plot, I found the narration switch at the end of the series to be just brilliant! I have never seen anything like that in the time travel genre, and I was both stunned and delighted by the transition.

All in all, Erased is a marvelous anime that deserves your attention if even the slightest bit of this review caught your eye.

Thank you so much for reading this post. If you enjoyed it please give it a like and leave a comment down below if you have anything to add, any questions, or if you hold a different opinion of this anime than my own. I promise I will respond to you. If you want to stay up to date with this blog, you can subscribe via email in the upper right tab. Alternatively, you can stay informed by liking the official BaddaBing BaddaBlog Facebook Page, or you can follow me, @LucasDeRuyter, on Twitter. I hope you all have a great week, and be sure to visit 4B again on Wednesday for the next installment of Pop Culture Wednesday.

BaddaBing, BaddaBye

Manga (And Also Anime) Monday: Erased Review